May 11, 2010
The Alaska HighwayLooking south from Alaska into an unorganized part of the Yukon Territory on the Alaska Highway. The borderline between Canada and the United States is represented by the boundary vista (the treeless line) that passes through the monument park (and between the flags) on the left side of this photograph. The driver of the orange car is parked in the U.S.
From this point, Fairbanks, Alaska, is 298 miles away and Anchorage is 421 miles away.  The U.S. border patrol station is 1,000 feet to the northwest. (Click here and then click forward to watch the seasons change.)(Google Maps)

The Alaska Highway
Looking south from Alaska into an unorganized part of the Yukon Territory on the Alaska Highway. The borderline between Canada and the United States is represented by the boundary vista (the treeless line) that passes through the monument park (and between the flags) on the left side of this photograph. The driver of the orange car is parked in the U.S.

From this point, Fairbanks, Alaska, is 298 miles away and Anchorage is 421 miles away.  The U.S. border patrol station is 1,000 feet to the northwest. (Click here and then click forward to watch the seasons change.)

(Google Maps)

May 6, 2010
U.S. Highway 6 (Business Route)Looking north on the borderline between Grand County, Utah, on the west and Mesa County, Colorado, on the east. The stone monument marks the borderline, as does the road in the background. 
Now formally known as a business route of its former self, this road used to be a part of the main U.S. Highway 6, which runs from Connecticut to California. The “new” (and official) U.S. Highway 6 currently overlaps with U.S. Highway 50 and Interstate 70, one mile due south of this point.
(Google Maps, Route 6: The Longest Transcontinental Highway)

U.S. Highway 6 (Business Route)
Looking north on the borderline between Grand County, Utah, on the west and Mesa County, Colorado, on the east. The stone monument marks the borderline, as does the road in the background. 

Now formally known as a business route of its former self, this road used to be a part of the main U.S. Highway 6, which runs from Connecticut to California. The “new” (and official) U.S. Highway 6 currently overlaps with U.S. Highway 50 and Interstate 70, one mile due south of this point.

(Google Maps, Route 6: The Longest Transcontinental Highway)